Your Experience & Thoughts ยป Little Miracles: Part 1

  • Steve Rapson
    Steve Rapson Boston
    What is a miracle? According to Wikipedia it is: A miracle is an event not explicable by natural or scientific laws. Such an event may be attributed to a supernatural being (a deity), magic, a miracle worker, a saint or a religious leader. It appears what I have been referring to miracles in my life are a bit of a stretch according to that definition. So here is my personal definition of a miracle: A miracle is an outcome that I have endlessly hoped for, earnestly striven for, and generally failed in achieving. But, then surprise! Victory! Victory unexpected. Here are two examples of what I consider miracles in my life. A little one, and a bigger one. Part 1, the little one. Many years ago my friend, Alicia, and I were in Boston. It was a frigid, windy February night. We walked around the city, attended a meeting, had tea at the Copley. On returning to her car Alicia discovered she had lost an earring. A valued treasure. She cried at its loss. I suggested we retrace our steps, she one way, I the other. "It's pointless," she said, "in the cold and dark... all the walking we did. It could be anywhere." She was inconsolable. With recently found serenity in my heart, I said, "Alicia, we are in charge of looking, not of finding. Let's go look." So we parted to begin the search for the lost earring. I did not expect to find anything. But still I looked. I really looked. Icy wind in my face, I stared down at the sidewalk and curb as I walk slowly along the route we had taken. It was a long way and my face was numb by the time I reached the beginning of our route. I turned around to go back and... Voila! There glinting in the gutter was the golden earring. I had a moment. And began to believe the things I was learning about being empty of expectations. About seeking and finding, and all that. Back at the car Alicia was herself again and said she was OK with the loss. I held up her earring with a big grin. "See," I said, "it works!" She cried again, happy tears, and gave me a big hug. We resolved to take away from this little event something bigger: Miracles of all sizes are more likely when we leave ourselves open to the possibility of their occurrence.

    What is a miracle? According to Wikipedia it is:

    A miracle is an event not explicable by natural or scientific laws. Such an event may
    be attributed to a supernatural being (a deity), magic, a miracle worker, a saint or a
    religious leader.

    It appears what I have been referring to miracles in my life are a bit of a stretch according to that definition.

    So here is my personal definition of a miracle:

    A miracle is an outcome that I have endlessly hoped for, earnestly striven for, and
    generally failed in achieving. But, then surprise! Victory! Victory unexpected.

    Here are two examples of what I consider miracles in my life. A little one, and a bigger one. Part 1, the little one.

    Many years ago my friend, Alicia, and I were in Boston. It was a frigid, windy February night. We walked around the city, attended a meeting, had tea at the Copley. On returning to her car Alicia discovered she had lost an earring. A valued treasure. She cried at its loss. I suggested we retrace our steps, she one way, I the other.

    "It's pointless," she said, "in the cold and dark... all the walking we did. It could be anywhere." She was inconsolable.

    With recently found serenity in my heart, I said, "Alicia, we are in charge of looking, not of finding. Let's go look."

    So we parted to begin the search for the lost earring. I did not expect to find anything. But still I looked. I really looked. Icy wind in my face, I stared down at the sidewalk and curb as I walk slowly along the route we had taken. It was a long way and my face was numb by the time I reached the beginning of our route. I turned around to go back and... Voila! There glinting in the gutter was the golden earring.

    I had a moment. And began to believe the things I was learning about being empty of expectations. About seeking and finding, and all that.

    Back at the car Alicia was herself again and said she was OK with the loss. I held up her earring with a big grin.

    "See," I said, "it works!" She cried again, happy tears, and gave me a big hug.

    We resolved to take away from this little event something bigger: Miracles of all sizes are more likely when we leave ourselves open to the possibility of their occurrence.

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